A Travel Book For Unconventional Travelers

This week, instead of offering the usual wine and book reviews, I’m letting you know about my latest self-publishing project: Nomad, a short illustrated book about the ups and downs of living on the road, without a fixed home, as I’ve been doing for just about one year now. 

When I left New York, having given up my apartment, packed up my books, and shoved some clothes and my laptop into two suitcases, I knew I needed a change of scenery, badly. What I also found was that I was heading into a time of self-change. I learned to be more adaptable, less attached to material things, kinder and more empathetic toward others — all in very concrete situations. Most of these situations are things we do encounter in regular, daily life, but I found that they were more heightened while living as a modern nomad.

I felt the need to share these lessons by committing them to the page, and to do so with illustrations as well as a mixture of storytelling, advice, and even provocation. I’m guessing many of you dream of giving up your job or life and traveling for a year or moving to a new city, perhaps abroad. Or maybe you know someone like this, who needs a fresh start.

Moving or starting a journey without a concrete plan are difficult things to do, but sometimes they are the necessary path toward creative fulfillment or renewed happiness. Nomad is a book to support and encourage these dreams, and coax them into reality. I’ve made a Kickstarter (link here) which features a video of myself explaining the project in further detail.

I hope you can take a moment to check out the Kickstarter, and I look forward to sharing the book with you in just a few months!

If all goes to plan (i.e. my nonstop hustling results fruitful), I’ll have Nomad on sale in independent bookstores around the world — and I plan to donate 10 percent of those sales to the International Rescue Committee, an established non-profit organization that works globally to support displaced communities, help out in humanitarian crises, and engage in policy work — because not everyone chooses to be a nomad.

Back to your #apérohourweekly with the next edition of this blog!

xRachel

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